From the Stereo to Your Screen #14, U2 & Batman Forever

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On this episode of From the Stereo to Your Screen, we're running down the music video for U2's “Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me,” from 1995's Batman Forever. The animated music video is absolutely bonkers -- basically an anime nightmare -- and this sentence from the Wikipedia entry on the song sums it up nicely:

“It features the band performing in Gotham City, with Bono battling between two of his alter-egos from the Zoo TV Tour: ‘The Fly’ and ‘MacPhisto.’ The band also chases the Batwing, using a yellow supercar and their guitars as flamethrowers.”

You can read the original column and watch the music video at Cinepunx.

From the Stereo to Your Screen #9, "Phunk Junkeez & Tommy Boy"

Once upon a time, rap-rock act Phunk Junkeez had covered KISS’ “I Love It Loud.” It wasn't until I tracked down the video to troll my uncle with it on Facebook that I discovered that the song had been on the soundtrack to the 1995 Chris Farley / David Spade comedy, Tommy Boy. The video’s not only loaded with clips from the film, but Chris Farley is on stage thrashing around with the band. The movie’s full of pretty memorable musical moments — the car singalong, most notably — but I’d pretty much spaced on this particular jawn.

You can find the video for the song, as well as the original column behind this podcast at Cinepunx.

From the Stereo to Your Screen #8, "The Coupe de Villes & Big Trouble in Little China"

This song’s rough. Carpenter’s a great musician, an excellent director, and interesting cat, but he sings like Jim Morrison fronting an ’80s skinny tie bar band. Like Huey Lewis and the News, but without the edge. The Coupe De Villes were basically this band that Carpenter put together in the ’80s as a way to have some fun. The band also featured director Tommy Lee Wallace and actor Nick Castle, and their one and only LP, Waiting Out the Eighties, was never commercially released. It wasn’t even supposed to be much more than a lark, but somehow, they’ve become this weird obsession for record collecting movie fans.

You can find the video for the song, as well as the original column behind this podcast at Cinepunx.

From the Stereo to Your Screen #7, "The Dickies & Killer Klowns From Outer Space"

This is, quite honestly, one of my favorite songs of all time. Any chance I have to work it onto a compilation, mix tape, radio show, podcast, or otherwise, I will foist it upon those listening. Not only is it the theme to an excellently underrated movie, but it’s probably the best punk song to ever use “Entry of the Gladiators” as its backbone.

Granted, it’s probably the only punk song to use the circus calliope as its backbone, but still — fantastically catchy song. The Dickies have always existed as this strange bunch of circus freaks playing rapid-fire covers of classic rock songs, but their originals are at once ridiculously simple pop confections, as well as intricately-worded blasts of punk.

You can find the video for the song, as well as the original column behind this podcast at Cinepunx.

From the Stereo to Your Screen #5, "Bobby Brown & Ghostbusters II"

The video for Bobby Brown’s “On Our Own” is a textbook case of how music videos from films sometimes use the slimmest of connections in order to sell a movie. Watching the video, it seems like the director shot two different ideas for the song — one for the song before it was attached to the film, and the other afterward — and then stitched them together as best he could.

On this episode of From the Stereo to Your Screen, we discuss Bobby Brown's video for "On Our Own," from the film Ghostbusters II. You can read the original column and see the video at Cinepunx.

From the Stereo to Your Screen #3, "Last Action Hero & AC/DC"

1993's Last Action Hero bombed so hard, people were baffled at how good and successful the following year’s True Lies ended up being. That, however, was basically a last gasp, and with the exception of Schwarzenegger’s appearances in the Expendables films, his ability to make a film make bank with his name above the title essentially ended with Last Action Hero.

Watching the video for AC/DC's "Big Gun," one can easily start to parse out why. Whereas the video for the prior year’s “You Could Be Mine” by Guns ‘n’ Roses saw Arnold being a cold, calculating badass, this one is precisely the opposite.

On this episode of From the Stereo to Your Screen, we discuss AC/DC's video for "Big Gun," from the film Last Action Hero. You can read the original column and see the video at Cinepunx.

From the Stereo to Your Screen #2, "Addams Family & MC Hammer"

The brightest stars burn briefest, as the saying goes. MC Hammer’s Please Hammer, Don’t Hurt ‘Em and Too Legit to Quit were released back-to-back in 1990 and 1991, and by the time The Funky Headhunter dropped three years later, hip-hop had moved from the pop-friendly jams of Hammer, Young MC, and Vanilla Ice to the likes of Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, and Tupac.

On this episode of From the Stereo to Your Screen, we discuss Hammer's video for "Addams Groove," from the film The Addams Family. You can read the original column and see the video at Cinepunx.

From the Stereo to Your Screen #1, "Clerks & Soul Asylum"

We talk the video for Soul Asylum's "Can't Even Tell" from the soundtrack to Clerks for the inaugural episode of From and Inspired By the Stereo to Your Screen. These podcasts will be short mini-episodes focusing on music videos for various films, and will run in the weeks where there aren't new episodes of From & Inspired By. Episodes are audio versions of the From the Stereo to Your Screen columns I write over at Cinepunx.